Effects of Psilocybin in Major Depressive Disorder

The proposed pilot study will assess whether people with major depressive disorder experience psychological and behavioral benefits and/or harms from psilocybin.

This study will investigate acute and persisting effects of psilocybin on depressive symptoms and other moods, attitudes, and behaviors. The primary hypothesis is that psilocybin will lead to rapid and sustained antidepressant response, as measured with standard depression rating scales.

Status Completed
Results Published Yes
Start date 10 August 2017
End date 02 December 2020
Chance of happening 100%
Phase Phase II
Design Blinded
Type Interventional
Generation First
Participants 24
Sex All
Age 21- 75
Therapy Yes

Trial Details

The proposed pilot study will assess whether people with major depressive disorder experience psychological and behavioral benefits and/or harms from psilocybin. This study will investigate acute and persisting effects of psilocybin on depressive symptoms and other moods, attitudes, and behaviors. The primary hypothesis is that psilocybin will lead to rapid and sustained antidepressant response, as measured with standard depression rating scales.

NCT Number NCT03181529

Sponsors & Collaborators

Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins University (Medicine) is host to the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research, which is one of the leading research institutes into psychedelics. The center is led by Roland Griffiths and Matthew Johnson.

Papers

Effects of Psilocybin-Assisted Therapy on Major Depressive Disorder
This randomized open-label study (n=24) found that two sessions with psilocybin (20 and 30mg/70kg) significantly improved depression scores for a population with major depressive disorder (MDD) up to 8 weeks later.

Measures Used

Hamilton Depression Rating Scale
The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) is a multiple item questionnaire used to provide an indication of depression, and as a guide to evaluating recovery. The scale consists of 17 items which each item being scoring on a 3 or 5 point scale. The higher the score, the more likely a person is depressed.

Data attribution

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