Does ±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy) induce subjective feelings of social connection in humans? A multilevel meta-analysis

This meta-analysis (2021) explored the effect MDMA has on self-reported feelings of social connection in humans by combining the data from 27 placebo-controlled studies. It was found that MDMA has a moderate-to-large effect on self-reported sociability outcomes, suggesting that MDMA may have powerful implications for a variety of social situations.

Abstract

“3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a psychostimulant known for producing positive subjective effects and for enhancing social functioning and social connection in both clinical and recreational settings. Over the past two decades, scientists have begun to study the psychological effects of MDMA through rigorous placebo-controlled experimental work. However, most existing studies have small Ns, and the average sizes of the reported effects are unknown, creating uncertainty about the impact of these findings. The goal of the present study was to quantify the strength of MDMA’s effects on self-reported social connection by aggregating sociability-related outcomes across multiple placebo-controlled studies. To this end, we conducted a multilevel meta-analysis based on 27 studies, 54 effect sizes, and a total of 592 participants. The results revealed a moderate-to-large effect (d = 0.86; 95% CI [0.68, 1.04]; r = .39; 95% CI [.32, .46]) of MDMA on self-reported sociability-related outcomes (e.g., feeling loving, talkative, and friendly). Given the magnitude of its effect on felt sociability, we propose that MDMA may have powerful implications for a variety of social contexts and for clinical settings, in particular. Finally, we discuss potential mechanisms underlying the relationship between MDMA and sociability-related feelings, as well as future directions for experimental work in this area.”

Authors: Annie Regan, Seth Margolis, Harriet de Wit, & Sonja Lyubomirsky

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Study details

Compounds studied
MDMA

Topics studied
Personality

Study characteristics
Meta-Analysis

Participants
592 Humans

Authors

Authors associated with this publication with profiles on Blossom

Annie Regan
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Seth Margolis
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Harriet de Wit
Harriet de Wit is a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on the physiological, subjective (i.e., mood-altering), and behavioral effects of drugs in healthy human volunteers.

Sonja Lyubomirsky
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